Promoting positivity is not always about your position, title, or role in a company. Even some of the top CEOs don’t have it all figured out. What distinguishes a successful person is their leadership and qualities. I recently spent time reading “The Corner Office,” by Adam Bryant. The book reveals testimonials by CEO’s of many well-known companies. From that book and through working at Breadcrumbs alongside our CEO, I created a list of 6 things employees and/or CEOs can do to promote a positive workplace.

Passionate Curiosity
Before reading this book, I already possessed passionate curiosity– I just didn’t know it. Working as a community manager, requires you to be knowledgeable about all of the field(s) you are managing for, but it may be difficult if you don’t keep up to date with that industry.

I spend most of my day researching industry news and keeping up-to-date on what is happening so I am able to speak and interact knowledgeably. But by being passionate and curious, I am able to intake extensive amounts of information on certain topics without feeling overwhelmed. I’ve also realized that the CEO is not necessarily the smartest person in the room when it comes to every little thing. Instead, he knows his strengths and weaknesses and hires accordingly to build a strong team. Everyone on the Breadcrumbs Team is skilled and capable and we learn so much from each other.

Team Smart
Being team smart begins with learning to work well with others. Then, you must understand the role each person on the team plays. At Breadcrumbs, everyone plays a significant role towards the company’s success. Titles don’t mean much but knowing each person is responsible for specific tasks allows us to work and collaborate well. Outlining certain responsibilities helps me understand my essential role in each project.

If you work with the team smart mindset every day, productivity will be at an all-time high.

Fearlessness
Be a go-getter! For someone who started a company while in college and took risks in order to build and grow, creating a “culture of action” isn’t all that difficult. All CEOs/entrepreneurs should be fearless. But who says the employees shouldn’t be as well?

At Breadcrumbs, we have the freedom to create our own schedules. Of course, we have set duties and deadlines, but each person has the power to work the way they feel most productive and comfortable. We can take risks and do out-of-the-box things if we believe it will contribute to the betterment of the company.

Although we all don’t have the same level of experience, we all know enough to take on that freedom. It’s better to have a workplace where it is okay to take risks rather than to be boxed in and defined by a title and job description. Hands-on learning and educated trials and errors can be very effective methods to learning. I’m always mindful of the mistakes I make, and ultimately learn from them. What can I do better next time? What can I take away from the situation for work and personal?

Being fearless leads to becoming a better decision maker.

Stop Procrastination
Create a schedule. Make a to-do list. Break down big tasks into smaller ones while grouping similar tasks.

These are all steps we’re always told that should help put an end to procrastination. But what are some things you never think about? Like how you should be motivated to work which in effect will squash procrastination. At Breadcrumbs, we always incorporate work and play so the day doesn’t become a drag. We promote “more fun at work” so we do things like boogie to our favorite music, get inspiration from magazines, and watch comedy shows in the background while working.

I usually get motivated and stop procrastinating by being around people who are working. When I’m in a work environment, I feel the need to be busy. I get that “do it now” attitude.

Lastly, find a place of comfort to work. Lounge on a beanbag chair or sit on a couch instead of a typical office chair. This isn’t hard to do in our office, being that we have a variety of options where we can relax and be productive. Plus, the “boogie”-playlist is always pumping the latest tunes.

Cut Distractions
My job involves me being logged in to different social network platforms all day, every day! It can get really distracting when my BFF is posting a picture of what she had for lunch on Facebook… one “like” won’t hurt me… Next thing I know, I’m strolling down my timeline. Then, I find myself on Instagram, scrolling and double-tapping photos.

So, how do I cut my distractions?
I set a certain time to check my personal accounts. Whether, it’s during my lunch break or using the Pomodoro clock, I set specific break times throughout my day and schedule in personal time.

Checking emails can also be a distraction even though it’s considered ‘work’ and you feel like it is just as important as any other task. When you’re receiving emails all day, checking them can distract you from whatever you are trying to focus on. Just like social networks, schedule a time to check your emails all at once. And when it’s not time to do so, turn off those automatic notifications.

It will be relieving and you’ll find that you get much more work done.

Find a Purpose
Last but not least, if you have no purpose in what you do, then you have no purpose in life. Find your reason for coming to work each day beyond the ‘paycheck’ and company-sponsored lunch. This will help you stay positive throughout the day. And if you have a positive attitude it will surely spread through your entire office!

This blog post was originally posted on our other website.

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